Month: January 2023

Cardiovascular-related deaths increased dramatically in 2020, marking the largest single-year increase since 2015 and surpassing the previous record from 2003, according to the American Heart Association’s 2023 Statistical Update. During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the largest increases in cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths were seen among Asian, Black, and Hispanic people. “We thought
0 Comments
Toddlers whose moms were exposed to higher levels of air pollution during mid- to late-pregnancy tend to score lower on measures of cognition, motor coordination and language skills, according to new University of Colorado Boulder research. Published today in the journal Environmental Health, the study of Latino mother-child pairs is among the first to assess
0 Comments
The vital role of oxytocin-;the “love hormone”-;for social attachments is being called into question. More than forty years of pharmacological and behavioral research has pointed to oxytocin receptor signaling as an essential pathway for the development of social behaviors in prairie voles, humans, and other species, but a genetic study publishing in the journal Neuron
0 Comments
In this video, Jeremy Faust, MD, editor-in-chief of MedPage Today, discusses his recent article diving into new studies on the effectiveness of the COVID-19 bivalent booster versus the monovalent booster. The following is a transcript of his remarks: One thing that people are really interested in right now is this question as to whether the
0 Comments
Sustaining even a single head injury has been linked to a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality in new research. An analysis of more than 13,000 adult participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study showed a dose-response pattern in which one head injury was linked to a 66% increased risk for all-cause mortality, and
0 Comments
Human brain atlases can be used by medical professionals to track normative trends over time and to pinpoint crucial aspects of early brain development. With these atlases, they are able to see what typical structural and functional development looks like, making it easier for them to spot the symptoms of abnormal development, such as attention-deficit
0 Comments
A nerve stimulation therapy developed at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons is showing promise in animal studies and may eventually allow people with spinal cord injuries to regain function of their arms. “The stimulation technique targets the nervous system connections spared by injury,” says Jason Carmel, MD, PhD, a neurologist at Columbia
0 Comments
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval to pirtobrutinib (Jaypirca) for relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) after at least two lines of systemic therapy, including a Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor. Pirtobrutinib is the first and only non-covalent BTK inhibitor approved for use in this MCL setting, manufacturer Eli
0 Comments
Children have largely avoided severe COVID-19 symptoms because they have a strong initial ‘innate’ immune reaction that quickly defeats the virus. And now, researchers led by scientists at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research have uncovered what this might mean for the immune system. Unlike those of adults, children’s immune systems don’t remember the virus
0 Comments
The Skill Patient safety, patient experience, workforce health, and cost-effectiveness are critical outcomes with an important common root. They’re all impacted by our ability to communicate effectively and respectfully. These skills also encompass behaviors inherent in many properties of complex adaptive systems, such as the butterfly effect, flexibility, and adaptability. The more we understand these
0 Comments
Sign up for CNN’s Wonder Theory science newsletter. Explore the universe with news on fascinating discoveries, scientific advancements and more. CNN  —  Analysis of fossils found in the far north of Canada has revealed that two previously unknown species of ancient near-primates lived above the Arctic Circle some 52 million years ago, according to new
0 Comments
The US Food and Drug Administration approved elacestrant (Orserdu, Stemline Therapeutics, Inc) for postmenopausal women or men with ER-positive, HER2-negative, ESR1-mutated advanced or metastatic breast cancer that progressed on at least one line of endocrine therapy. The agency also approved the Guardant360 CDx assay as a companion diagnostic to identify breast cancer patients who meet
0 Comments
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced a grant of $30,000 to Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso for the Farmworkers Pesticide Use Protection Project. The project will educate migrant farmworkers and their families on the health effects and safe use of pesticides as they work along the U.S.-Mexico border. The educational project
0 Comments
Turning a decades-old dogma on its head, new research from scientists at UC San Francisco and Stanford Medicine shows that the receptor for oxytocin, a hormone considered essential to forming social bonds, may not play the critical role that scientists have assigned to it for the past 30 years. In the study, appearing Jan. 27,
0 Comments
A number of high-performing medical schools that have withdrawn from the annual U.S. News & World Report rankings also have related hospitals that also regularly top the outlet’s “Best Hospitals” list. So, what might the medical school decampment mean for affiliated hospitals going forward? Indeed, several medical schools have said their decisions to not participate
0 Comments
Easy Keto Oreo Chaffles Recipe – Diabetes Daily Learning Center Learning Center: LearningCenter Diabetes Daily does not provide medical advice,diagnosis or treatment.Get additional information.© 2005 – 2023 Everyday Health, Inc., a Ziff Davis company. Everyday Health is among the federally registered trademarks of Everyday Health, Inc. and may not be used by third parties without
0 Comments
As if periods aren’t awful enough on their own, we have news that might make them worse — especially if you’ve come to love period underwear. A recently settled lawsuit claims that Thinx misrepresented its products as safe, sustainable, and free from harmful chemicals and nanoparticles. According to the lawsuit, third-party testing found that its
0 Comments