Cancer Research UK honours Her Majesty The Queen, the charity’s Patron

Cancer
Photo of HM Queen Elizabeth II

The Queen has been the charity’s Patron since its formation in 2002. Professor Sir Leszek Borysiewicz, Chair of Cancer Research UK, expressed his deepest sympathies to the Queen’s family.

“I was greatly saddened to hear the news of the death of Her Majesty The Queen.

“As our Patron, she kindly supported us over the years, opening our laboratories and institutes which are an integral part of the charity’s pioneering work into the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

“During her remarkable reign the Queen generously supported many charities, shining a light on the work they do and making an enormous difference to millions of people up and down the country. She set an example for all of us – and leaves a lasting legacy for which we are hugely grateful.”

Decades of service

The Queen had been the Patron of the Imperial Cancer Research Fund since 1953 and Patron of Cancer Research UK following the merger in 2002 with Cancer Research Campaign.

In one of her first acts as the charity’s Patron, the Queen opened the London Research Institute at Lincoln’s Inn Fields in 1963.

In 2002, the Queen held a reception at Buckingham Palace to celebrate the merger of the Imperial Cancer Research Fund and Cancer Research Campaign to become Cancer Research UK. She then opened the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute in 2007 and the Francis Crick Institute in London in 2016, accompanied by The Duke of Edinburgh and The Duke of York.

“Our sadness at this time is shared by people across the globe, as we remember with affection and gratitude the lifetime of service given by our longest-reigning monarch,” says Borysiewicz.

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