Children

A cell-based influenza vaccine has effectively provided protection against the flu in children and adolescents, according to a new study. The research found the cell-based quadrivalent influenza vaccine (QIVc) produced a sufficient immune response in children aged two to 18 years. The lead investigator on the study was Professor Terry Nolan, head of the Vaccine
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An artificial intelligence (AI)-based technology rapidly diagnoses rare disorders in critically ill children with high accuracy, according to a report by scientists from University of Utah Health and Fabric Genomics, collaborators on a study led by Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego. The benchmark finding, published in Genomic Medicine, foreshadows the next phase of medicine,
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Children with cerebral palsy can gain greater use of an impaired arm and hand with larger doses of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) – without increasing stress for parents, according to a new study by researchers at Virginia Tech’s Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC, UVA Children’s, The Ohio State University, and Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The
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A researcher at Binghamton University, State University of New York has received a $1.74 million, five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to explore how prenatal alcohol exposure leads to ‘anxious’ offspring. Binghamton University Associate Professor of Psychology Marvin Diaz received the grant. Called “Prenatal Alcohol and Anxiety: An Ontogenetic Role for CRF,” the
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Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) — a common treatment for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) — likely works by depleting immune cells called neutrophils, according to a recent study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). MIS-C is a rare condition that usually affects school-age children who initially had only mild COVID-19 symptoms or
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The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded researchers at University of California San Diego approximately $30 million over five years to expand and deepen longitudinal studies of the developing brain in children. Specifically, the funding will accelerate an ambitious effort to better understand how young brains and minds develop from infancy through early childhood
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Young adults who experience a traumatic injury are now more likely to have insurance coverage and access to rehabilitation if they live in a state that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), new study findings show. Further, states that expanded Medicaid also saw greater reductions in socioeconomic and racial disparities in certain areas,
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More than 2,100 babies are stillborn in Australia every year – a statistic that hasn’t changed in nearly 30 years. A Queensland professor and her team are determined to make a difference this International Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness month. Director of the Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth Mater Research Institute-University of Queensland’s Professor
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In late December 2019, a novel pneumonia-like lung infection was reported in the Chinese province of Hubei. This, in turn, led to the ongoing coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. COVID-19 is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is closely related to SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) and MERS (the Middle East Respiratory
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There has been a considerable amount of controversy surrounding whether pregnant women with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are at a higher risk for poor outcomes for themselves and their babies. A recent study suggests the answer depends on the presence of symptoms at near term. “Most pregnancy and delivery outcomes were similar between COVID-19-positive
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In an unprecedented effort to address the harmful effects of structural racism on health, 60 predominantly Black neighborhoods in Philadelphia will be part of an ambitious study to assess the impact of a multi-component intervention addressing both environmental and economic injustice on health and well-being, led by Penn Medicine researchers Eugenia C. South, MD, MHSP,
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The World Health Organization’s recommendation of broad deployment of the first malaria vaccine among children in Sub-Saharan Africa has been widely celebrated, but scientists warn it could face hurdles in its acquisition and distribution by endemic countries. The WHO on Wednesday recommended extensive use of the RTS,S vaccine among children in Sub-Saharan Africa and other
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In a new study published in the journal BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, researchers discuss the basic and clinical science of the potential inter-relationships between diabetes mellitus and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in pregnancies. Study: SARS-CoV-2 in diabetic pregnancies: a systematic scoping review. Image Credit: Halfpoint / Shutterstock.com About the study Both COVID-19 and diabetes mellitus
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The COVID-19 pandemic forced the hand of many. Schools, universities, businesses – nearly every organization that provides any form of in-person education either began offering or enhanced their online programming. But even years before the pandemic, online learning was growing in popularity. In 2018, more than 100 million learners enrolled in massive open online courses
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A potentially deadly new challenge called “dry scooping” is prevalent on the internet, and new research shows video demonstrations on one social media platform popular among teens amassed more than 8 million views. Dry scooping refers to the improper use of pre-workout supplements, a powder typically added to liquid and containing ingredients that are unsuitable
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The estimated incidence of myocarditis among patients that have received at least one dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech (BNT162b2) mRNA vaccine against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was 2.13 cases per 100,000 persons, primarily affecting young men and presenting mostly as mild or moderate illness, as demonstrated by a recent study published in the New England Journal
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Researchers with Johns Hopkins Children’s Center found that more than half of all violence-related injuries in youth treated in the emergency department (ED) were due to family violence, including child maltreatment and physical fighting. Most events involved parents or guardians. The researchers also found the majority of family violence-related injury happened at home, and the
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The World Health Organization (WHO) is recommending widespread use of the RTS,S/AS01 (RTS,S) malaria vaccine among children in sub-Saharan Africa and in other regions with moderate to high P. falciparum malaria transmission. The recommendation is based on results from an ongoing pilot programme in Ghana, Kenya and Malawi that has reached more than 800 000
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