Clinical Trials & Research

In a recent study published in ASAIO Journal, researchers comparatively assessed mortality rates among CARDS [coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) acute respiratory distress syndrome] patients on ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern (VOCs) during the first wave (W1), the second wave (W2) and the third wave
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Scientists led by the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland are exploring the elaborate interplay between genes, sex, growth, and age and how they influence variation in longevity. Their findings, which are being published in the peer-reviewed journal Science, are an important step in
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More than 300,000 babies globally are born every year with sickle cell, a hereditary condition which causes red blood cells to become sickle-shaped. These unusually shaped cells do not live as long as healthy blood cells and can block blood vessels, sometimes resulting in painful swelling or even stroke. In many countries, families of children
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Since the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), numerous viral variants have emerged. These variants have shown enhanced transmissibility, virulence, and immune evasion capacity. The most recent of these variants of concern (VOCs) to be detected is the Omicron B.1.1.529 variant, which comprises
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In a recent study posted to the bioRxiv* server, researchers performed a genomic study of confirmed Monkeypox virus (MPXV) cases diagnosed in Spain between 18 May and 14 July 2022. Study: Genomic accordions may hold the key to Monkeypox Clade IIb’s increased transmissibility. Image Credit: FOTOGRIN/Shutterstock Background In the current outbreak, the number of disseminated
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A recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that a genome-wide polygenic score for coronary artery disease (GPSCAD) can predict sudden and/or arrhythmic death (SAD) risk in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients without severe systolic dysfunction. Thus, this assessment score may help guide indications of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) in this group
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Young children in sub-Saharan Africa often become severely anaemic as consequence of a malaria infection. Treating them requires blood transfusions and they must stay hospitalized for several days. They are at a relatively high risk of dying during treatment, but the risk is even higher during the months after their discharge from hospital – typically
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Using advanced diffusion neuroimaging technology, Kessler Foundation researchers investigated the relationship between the rate of cognitive fatigue to microstructural changes in the brain in persons with multiple sclerosis. Their findings help fill a gap in the current understanding of how brain pathology influences the development of fatigue over time. Their findings were reported in Frontiers
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Each day, millions of biological processes occur in our body at a cellular level. Studying these processes can help us learn more about how cells function, a field that has continued to intrigue researchers. Recently, however, there has been a new player in this field. A new analytical method-;single-molecule detection-;has gained momentum due to its
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In a recent study published in PLOS ONE, researchers used a controlled olfactory paradigm to assess whether dogs could discriminate between human odors in breath and sweat samples before and after experiencing experimentally induced negative psychological stress. Study: Dogs can discriminate between human baseline and psychological stress condition odours. Image Credit: smrm1977/Shutterstock Background A stress
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In a recent study posted to the bioRxiv* preprint server, researchers explored the crystalline structure of the monkeypox (MPX) virus (MPXV) and the complex of VP39, a 2′-O-RNA methyltransferase (MTase) and sinefungin, a pan-MTase inhibitor. Study: The structure of monkeypox virus 2’-O-ribose methyltransferase VP39 in complex with sinefungin provides the foundation for inhibitor design. Image
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Scientists are still trying to understand why many breast cancer survivors experience troubling cognitive problems for years after treatment. Inflammation is one possible culprit. A new long-term study of older breast cancer survivors published today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology and co-led by UCLA researchers adds important evidence to that potential link. Higher levels
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Epileptic seizures are frequent among patients with cerebral venous thrombosis — a blood clot affecting the venous system of the brain. A thesis from University of Gothenburg suggests that some of these patients should be diagnosed with epilepsy and offered medication to prevent further seizures. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an unusual cause of stroke
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Sep 29 2022 A recent study published in the Clinical Infectious Diseases journal assessed the remdesivir resistance developed in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-infected transplant recipients. Study: Remdesivir resistance in transplant recipients with persistent COVID-19. Image Credit: Sonis Photography/Shutterstock Background Proactive therapy is necessary for patients needing hospitalization due to the significant risk of severe acute
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The physiological processes associated with an acute psychological stress response produce changes in human breath and sweat that dogs can detect with an accuracy of 93.75%, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Clara Wilson of Queen’s University Belfast, UK, and colleagues. Odors emitted by the body
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In a recent study posted to the medRxiv* preprint server, researchers assessed the effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccination in the US. Study: The impact of COVID-19 vaccination in the US: averted burden of SARS-COV-2-related cases, hospitalizations and deaths. Image Credit: Siker Stock/Shutterstock Background By August 1st 2022, coronavirus disease 2019
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In a recent study posted to the medRxiv* preprint server, researchers assessed the association between indoor air respiratory pathogens and natural ventilation, carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, and air filtration. Study: Natural ventilation, low CO2 and air filtration are associated with reduced indoor air respiratory pathogens. Image Credit: ART-ur/Shutterstock Currently, little is known about the effects
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In a recent study published in Nature Medicine, researchers explored the potential of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolomic platform to estimate the risks for the onset of several medical conditions. Study: Metabolomic profiles predict individual multidisease outcomes. Image Credit: Forance/Shutterstock Background Prompt identification and prevention of risk factors associated with the development of
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In vitro fertilization (IVF) using frozen embryos may be associated with a 74% higher risk of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, according to new research published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal. In comparison, the study found that pregnancies from fresh embryo transfers – transferring the fertilized egg immediately after in vitro fertilization (IVF)
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In a recent study published in Immunity, researchers surveyed a comprehensive range of outcomes in patients diagnosed with myocarditis after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination in the United States (US). They followed up with these adolescents and young male patients after they received a messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) platform-based COVID-19 vaccine for a minimum of
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Tiny nets woven from DNA strands can ensnare the spike protein of the virus that causes COVID-19, lighting up the virus for a fast-yet-sensitive diagnostic test – and also impeding the virus from infecting cells, opening a new possible route to antiviral treatment, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
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Many asexual individuals, those with little to no sexual attraction, are in long-term satisfying romantic relationships, but there has been little study on how and why they last and thrive. New research from Michigan State University found that, despite asexuals’ lack of or dislike for sexual attraction, the ingredients that make for a successful relationship
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Neutrophils, the most abundant type of white blood cell, are the body’s first line of defense against infection. Foreign pathogens can stress the body and activate neutrophils. When activated, neutrophils employ various weapons to protect the body. But if overactivated, these weapons can damage the body’s own tissues. Lung tissue is saturated with blood vessels,
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New UMBC-led research in Frontiers in Microbiology suggests that viruses are using information from their environment to “decide” when to sit tight inside their hosts and when to multiply and burst out, killing the host cell. The work has implications for antiviral drug development. A virus’s ability to sense its environment, including elements produced by
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Why are certain body parts more prone to skin diseases than others? Two new UC Davis Health studies explored how differences in skin composition may lead to dermatological conditions, such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. “Skin does not have a uniform composition throughout the body,” said Emanual Maverakis, professor of dermatology, molecular medical microbiology at
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Low-income seniors were seven times more likely to visit a food pantry in the year after becoming eligible for Medicare, resulting in improved food security, according to a new study from UT Southwestern. The findings, published in Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, were based on data compiled on 543 households that visited Crossroads Community Services,
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A study published in the journal Cell demonstrates that dietary sugar increases the risk of metabolic syndrome by disrupting gut microbiota and suppressing protective T helper 17 (Th17) cells. Study: Microbiota imbalance induced by dietary sugar disrupts immune-mediated protection from metabolic syndrome. Image Credit: Alpha Tauri 3D Graphics/Shutterstock Background Consumption of a high-fat diet increases
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