News

Note that some links may require subscriptions. The Leapfrog Group recognized 115 hospitals with its annual top hospital awards. Lawmakers agreed to allow language into the National Defense Authorization Act that would repeal the COVID vaccine mandate for U.S. service members. (The Hill) Booster vaccines performed well against the Omicron BA.5 subvariant in serum tests,
0 Comments
Flu cases are higher than in a decade, and COVID-19 cases are up since Thanksgiving. So, this could be a rough season for respiratory infections — even as the spread of Respiratory syncytial virus seems to be calming down, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. “This year’s flu season is off to a
0 Comments
Intermittent fasting is all the rage today as people follow this method to gain health benefits. But a new study suggests that there may be possible negative consequences of fasting intermittently. The study, published in the journal Eating Behaviors, found intermittent fasting in adolescents and younger population can lead to behaviors and psychopathology of eating
0 Comments
We get what we incentivize. This is a basic rule. I’d love to say it’s a basic rule of humanity, but unfortunately, I have a background in psychology, so I know it goes a lot deeper than that — it’s a basic rule of every living creature. Humans are, in many ways, just very big
0 Comments
NASHVILLE — There is no negative impact of in utero exposure to antiseizure medications on children’s creativity, new research shows. Dr Kimford Meador The results of this study, along with other research, suggest the risk for cognitive problems “is fairly low” overall for children of women with epilepsy taking lamotrigine or levetiracetam, study investigator, Kimford
0 Comments
he COVID-19 pandemic affected people of all ages and from different walks of life, but just how much did it impact adolescents? In a new study, a team of researchers found that it may have physically altered teens’ brains. For their study, published Thursday in Biological Psychiatry: Global Open Science, the researchers compared the brains of teens
0 Comments
Federal officials plan to let the mpox emergency declaration expire at the end of January as cases continue to decrease.  “But we won’t take our foot off the gas — we will continue to monitor the case trends closely and encourage all at-risk individuals to get a free vaccine,” U.S. Department of Health and Human
0 Comments
New research suggests that body mass index (BMI) may influence response to topical corticosteroid (tCS) therapy for eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). The higher the patient’s BMI level, the lower the individual’s response to tCS therapy from a symptomatic, endoscopic, and histologic perspective, researchers observed in a retrospective study. Because there are few clinical predictors of response
0 Comments
“Science is not done on Rumble.” — Katrine Wallace, PhD, of the University of Illinois in Chicago, commenting on the anti-vaccine documentary “Died Suddenly” that premiered on Twitter and Rumble earlier this month. “COVID or not, most physicians go to work even if they’re not feeling 100 percent.” — Joel Zivot, MD, of Emory University
0 Comments
A new study supports the hypothesis that changes in levels of amyloid and tau occur many years before the emergence of clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). “Our results confirm accelerated biomarker changes during preclinical AD and highlight the important role of amyloid levels in tau accelerations,” the investigators note. “These data may suggest that
0 Comments
When the Skeptical Cardiologist was training as a cardiologist in the late 1980s there were two (unproven) concepts that had emerged from epidemiological research that I accepted as proven. The first was that consumption of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) of any type and in any food increased the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). The
0 Comments
Because of high out-of-pocket costs of new-to-market neurologic drugs that are of similar benefit as older agents, only a small percentage of patients with neurologic disorders have access to these cutting-edge medications, new research shows. “Our study of people with neurologic conditions found fewer than 20% were being treated with new medications,” study author Brian
0 Comments
The 24-hour news cycle is just as important to medicine as it is to politics, finance, or sports. At MedPage Today, new information is posted daily, but keeping up can be a challenge. As an aid for our readers, here is a 10-question quiz based on the news of the week. Topics include glasses as
0 Comments
Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. COVID-19 vaccines retained the ability to prevent deaths from COVID-19 in children and adolescents regardless of the dominant circulating variant, in a new study. The vaccine’s effectiveness against infection in the short term has been established, as has the waning effectiveness
0 Comments
“You have the good cancer.” These are the most common words that spill out of providers’ mouths to patients just being diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer. However, this statement does not make this diagnosis any easier to comprehend and digest the life-altering news that has been received by the patient. The survivability rate for this
0 Comments
Dr Marc Tessier-Lavigne Stanford University has launched a formal investigation into its own president, neuroscientist Marc Tessier-Lavigne, PhD, for alleged research misconduct pertaining to five scientific articles on which he was lead or coauthor. Stanford’s Board of Trustees is leading the investigation. The university’s student newspaper, the Stanford Daily, broke the news of the investigation
0 Comments
An online yoga program appears to be effective, feasible, and safe for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a new report. Participants reported a decrease in IBS-related symptoms and improvements in quality of life, fatigue, and perceived stress. “IBS affects upwards of 15%-20% of the North American population, and despite our advances in
0 Comments
As the U.S. enters the holiday season, there is fear that the flu situation could get more alarming in the coming weeks.  Based on the latest data from the Health and Human Services Department, flu hospitalizations have increased by nearly 30% in a week. More than 11,200 people were hospitalized due to the flu virus
0 Comments
Sitting across from a patient explaining a complicated treatment proposal, protocol, or medication may be one of the most complex yet crucial tasks you have as a physician. Although informed consent is at the forefront of shared decisions between you and your patient, there’s a fine line between providing enough information on the risks and
0 Comments
Scientists have created a machine that will listen to your farts, pee, and poop. Yes, that’s right. The machine will recognize and analyze the sound of each bathroom-related activity. The scientists have cleverly named the machine Synthetic Human Acoustic Reproduction Testing machine (S.H.A.R.T.). It is a mechanical device fitted with pumps, nozzles, and tubes. The
0 Comments
Australian actor Chris Hemsworth, best known for his role as Thor in the Marvel Universe, revealed he is at increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease due to a genetic predisposition. Hemsworth learned this while filming a new National Geographic series, “Limitless.” The docuseries has Hemsworth participate in extreme activities in an attempt to push back
0 Comments